Posts Tagged ‘snow’

Why does the snow sparkle so?

Saturday, January 7th, 2017

Lately around here we’ve been blessed with decent snow cover. A nice change from the last two winters. Nice fresh show that stays fresh thanks to lack of warm surges. To add to the beautiful scene, the snow has had lots of sparkles of light reflecting off the surface from the bright moon or nearby lights (there’s plenty of time to see this with days still solstice short). Here’s a couple photos (click on them for larger versions).

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Precipitation patterns & perceptions

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016
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Pick-up soccer on the Haines school sports field on 30 Sep 2106. Most years the field or the weather are not in too good of shape at this time of year.

Of all the weather elements, precipitation seems the most chaotic when it comes to spatial and temporal patterns. In reality, I think wind is probably more variable over both time and distance, but I guess we must understand that, since we don’t talk about it nearly as much as peculiar precipitation patterns such as long wet or dry periods, heavy precipitation events, adjacent areas getting very different amounts or types of precipitation, etc. When do these peculiarities rise above perception and prove to be truly unusual? (more…)

Celebrating the end of the snow drought

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

happy skierWhile some folks back east may have been mightily inconvenienced by recent snows, here in Alaska most people like to see a little snow in the winter. This winter many of us have seen very little. Here in Haines, one of the snowiest sea level towns anywhere, things were looking pretty brown until last week, when we got almost a foot of nice light snow. You could almost hear the relief around town, as folks got back into the swing of snow removal, or dusted off their skis. My family did both, plus made a batch of snow ice cream. (Never made snow ice cream? Strangely, as a meteorologist, Alaskan, skier, etc, I’d not even heard of it for my first 20-some years in Alaska! I was going do a whole post on snow ice cream but discovered it’s not the novelty I thought it was…just Google it.) (more…)

Cold Spring in Alaska

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

If you have been waiting to see some statistics on how our winter of 2011-2012 rated compared to climate history, or if you were hoping for a long range forecast (educated guess) for the summer of 2012, stay tuned, I am working on both. I’ve been preoccupied with getting the 2013 Alaska Weather Calendar printed and out to stores. That rush is easing and I hope to increase the blogging frequency at least to where it was before. If you would like an automatic email when a new article is posted, sign up for that service under “Subscribe to Posts” either on the menu items across the top of the page or on the right hand sidebar items.

Of course, I can’t really do a winter wrap-up or declare a winner in the Iditasnow until winter is a little more over, can I? Look at what has been happening around the state:

In the Arctic, no one expects anything like spring weather for some time to come. In fact, the weather there has been pretty average for this time of year: Temperatures in the 20s F (around -5C) with some wind, a little snow and blowing snow lately. However, just a few days ago it was below zero on the North Slope and Bering Strait area. After a very snowy winter in Kotzebue, the 27 inches (69 cm) of snow on the ground is holding steady with well below freezing temperatures.

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The plows are still needed in Shishmaref. Click on the image to see it full size.

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Iditasnow update & more snow rollers

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Haines beach volleyball court

Since the leap day checkpoint report, most towns have slowed their snowfall pace. Haines and Yakutat, however, have been running hard, each having added an impressive 50 inches this first half of March.

The Top Ten as of 15 March

place town total through 3/15 % of average % of record current depth
1 Haines 357.1” (9.08 meters) 243 116 61” (1.55 m)
2 Yakutat 313.3 (7.97) 218 78 85 (2.16)
3 Kodiak 134.9 (3.43) 196 84 12 (0.31)
4 Barrow 65.0 (1.65) 172 83 13 (0.33)
5 Anchorage 129.4 (3.29) 158 97 34 (0.86)
6 Juneau 130.5 (3.32) 151 66 Trace
7 Haines Customs 342.6 (8.72) 131 93 95 (2.42)
8 Valdez 426.0 (10.84) 131 76 87 (2.21)
8 Kotzebue 78.1 (1.99) 131 65 54 (1.37)
10 Cold Bay 87.7 (2.23) 120 76 23 (0.59)

Remember, the standings are based on snowfall this season compared to the station’s average yearly snowfall. (No, I did not come up with this rating scheme to just to put Haines in the lead). (more…)

Not the last great Alaska snow race

Saturday, March 3rd, 2012

Today is the start of the world famous Iditarod trail sled dog race (“the last great race”), so I thought maybe I should give an report on another (unofficial) great race: the Alaska snow race. It has been a very snowy winter in many parts of Alaska and there is plenty of talk and a little bragging and comparing between towns, so why not make a little fun of it? In no way am I wanting to make light of the real hardships experienced in places like Cordova and Valdez, where schools were closed for more than an isolated “snow day” due to fears of structural failure of school buildings, among other problems. Believe me, I understand the issue of dealing with tons of snow, since I live in one of the major league snow towns (Haines). What I want to do is compare details of a longer list of places facing heavy snow this winter, and look at why. First the standings, as of the leap day checkpoint: units are inches for snow and feet for elevation.

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How dense is snow?

Friday, February 17th, 2012

The huge section of heavy old snow pictured below finally slid off the roof of our shed sometime in the middle of the night recently. Luckily, it remained jammed vertically in the snow below and did not fall against the shed. What do think it weighs? Click on the photos for a better look…it’s the same berg from opposite ends.

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It would not be hard to estimate the weight of this thing if we knew its density. And you might want to know the density your snow for a variety of reasons. One of the more common reasons is to figure if the weight of the snow might damage something. Check out the scene from our school a couple weeks ago: (more…)